A 10 year member in one of my CEO peer groups shared this article by Ann Rees Anderson. Whether you are a business owner, currently employed or looking for that next opportunity, there’s a message for us all in this article. To me, 1st it is worth reading, scanning and sharing at your next leadership meeting and 2nd if you are struggling with hiring talent you might want to take a deeper dive into your “onboarding process” and get a current feel for which employee is your company hiring.

Being a great employee pays off with better positions, higher pay, and more frequent promotions. But some workers struggle to know exactly what it takes to become a truly great employee.

As an Entrepreneur and CEO one of the most important elements of having a successful company is having a workforce of great employees. That is why it is so important that leaders are able to explain things to employees in a way that can be easily understood and which creates a clear picture of what you are looking for.

The best explanation of how one becomes a great employee can be seen through a simple story known as The Parable Of The Oranges.

The Parable of the Oranges

There was a young man who had ambitions to work for a company because it paid very well and was very prestigious. He prepared his résumé and had several interviews. Eventually, he was given an entry-level position. Then he turned his ambition to his next goal—a supervisor position that would afford him even greater prestige and more pay. So he completed the tasks he was given. He came in early some mornings and stayed late so the boss would see him putting in long hours.

After five years a supervisor position became available. But, to the young man’s great dismay, another employee, who had only worked for the company for six months, was given the promotion. The young man was very angry, and he went to his boss and demanded an explanation.

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The wise boss said, “Before I answer your questions, would you do a favor for me?”

“Yes, sure,” said the employee.

“Would you go to the store and buy some oranges? My wife needs them.”

The young man agreed and went to the store. When he returned, the boss asked, “What kind of oranges did you buy?”

“I don’t know,” the young man answered. “You just said to buy oranges, and these are oranges. Here they are.”

“How much did they cost?” the boss asked.

“Well, I’m not sure,” was the reply. “You gave me $30. Here is your receipt, and here is your change.”

“Thank you,” said the boss. “Now, please have a seat and pay careful attention.”

Then the boss called in the employee who had received the promotion and asked him to do the same job. He readily agreed and went to the store.

When he returned, the boss asked, “What kind of oranges did you buy?”

“Well,” he replied, “the store had many varieties—there were navel oranges, Valencia oranges, blood oranges, tangerines, and many others, and I didn’t know which kind to buy. But I remembered you said your wife needed the oranges, so I called her. She said she was having a party and that she was going to make orange juice. So I asked the grocer which of all these oranges would make the best orange juice. He said the Valencia orange was full of very sweet juice, so that’s what I bought. I dropped them by your home on my way back to the office. Your wife was very pleased.”

“How much did they cost?” the boss asked.

“Well, that was another problem. I didn’t know how many to buy, so I once again called your wife and asked her how many guests she was expecting. She said 20. I asked the grocer how many oranges would be needed to make juice for 20 people, and it was a lot. So, I asked the grocer if he could give me a quantity discount, and he did! These oranges normally cost 75 cents each, but I paid only 50 cents. Here is your change and the receipt.”

The boss smiled and said, “Thank you; you may go.”

He looked over at the young man who had been watching. The young man stood up, slumped his shoulders and said, “I see what you mean,” as he walked dejectedly out of the office.

What was the difference between these two young men? They were both asked to buy oranges, and they did. You might say that one went the extra mile, or one was more efficient, or one paid more attention to detail. But the most important difference had to do with real intent rather than just going through the motions. The first young man was motivated by money, position, and prestige. The second young man was driven by an intense desire to please his employer and an inner commitment to be the best employee he could possibly be—and the outcome was obvious. (Excerpt from: “Living with a Purpose: The Importance of ‘Real Intent.’”, Randall L. Ridd)

Anyone can be a great employee if that is their real intent. But real intent must come from within. It doesn’t come from external motivators such as money or titles. Real intent comes from a genuine desire to do the right thing for the right reason along with an inner commitment to always put forth a best effort in all that one does. Great employees are willing to focus on helping others to become more successful and inevitably they themselves grow to become great leaders in the process. They take accountability for their actions and they own their mistakes. They gain reputations of being trustworthy and they earn the respect of their coworkers. And they understand the value of a team.

I have always found that the best way to get what you want is to help others to get what they want. By helping your Boss become more successful you will inevitably become more successful yourself. And that is exactly what great employees do.

~Amy Rees Anderson (follow my daily blogs at www.amyreesanderson.com/blog )